You've seen the ads for pills and similar products, either late at night or early in the morning, depending on your TV-viewing habits. They're loud. They're obnoxious. Maybe they feature a semi-famous pitch person.

"Last longer in bed!"

"Increase your stamina!"

What can it hurt, you wonder. Fortunately, your credit card is out of reach and you're not in the mood to move.

Supplements that purport to treat premature ejaculation (PE) should be approached with caution, said Andrew Cohen, M.D., director of trauma and reconstructive urologic surgery at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. These supplements are not evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which means no one has reviewed the possible risks and benefits of the products.

"Buyer beware," he said. "We just don't know how that would interact with other medicines you take, and we don't know if it's effective or not."

While you should be wary of sex pills advertised online and on television, prescription medications are available to effectively treat