More about this episode

A Conversation with Carlos O’Leary

Can Mucinex D really increase your odds of getting pregnant? One viral video on TikTok claims the common cold and flu medication can help women conceive. The theory goes: Mucinex thins the cervical mucus and allows sperm to travel more easily to reach an egg. But is it true?

The answer is probably not, despite the video's millions of views—as Carlos O'Leary points out in this week’s The Quickie. Also part of the show, we delve into adult filmmaker Erika Lust’s new "special work perk": that is, 30-minute masturbation breaks. Employees at her company can take a raunchy recess in a private masturbation station, equipped—of course—with lube, sexy toys, and ethical porn.

Already employees are reporting "less aggression" and "greater productivity." In our last segment of the show, we discuss a recent study that linked erectile dysfunction (E.D.) to vaping. The 2021 population-based study, which was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that daily users of electronic cigarettes are more than twice as likely to report E.D. symptoms as men who have never used e-cigarettes.

Transcript

Q:

TikTok. It's the home of trends, pseudo-celebrities, life hacks and enough should-be-obvious-nonsense to choke the internet, such as one trend that claims Mucinex D, a common cold and flu medication, can help women conceive.

I'm Carlos O'Leary and this is The Quickie.

SO, does Mucinex D really increase your odds of getting pregnant? The answer is probably not, despite this video that has garnered more than a million likes.

The theory goes: Mucinex thins the cervical mucus and allows sperm to travel more easily to reach an egg—kinda like what fish ladders do for salmon looking to spawn. The Mucinex D theory is little-researched, so most healthcare professionals reject it as a suitable treatment for women who want to get pregnant. And they add that you shouldn't take medicine you don't—you know—need. Shocker.

Our next story isn't so much "can you believe it?" as it is "can you believe it took so. Damn. Long?" Indie adult filmmaker Erika Lust officially became the world's #1 boss, no matter what your supervisor's coffee mug says. Why?

A "special work perk."

Under Lust's benevolent leadership, employees at her adult entertainment company are granted a daily 30-minute "masturbation break." Employees can take these raunchy recesses in a raunchy recess: a private masturbation station equipped with lube, sexy toys and ethical porn—basically, everything they need to get the job done right.

Thanks to these new, workplace-sanctioned erotic intermissions, employees are reporting "less aggression" and "greater productivity." And if the idea of playing downstairs DJ at your office makes you squirm, you should know this: one 2015 TimeOut survey suggested as many as 39 percent of people masturbate during work.

That makes pleasuring yourself one of the most popular in-office activities—only slightly less popular than Googling pictures of baby goats doing yoga, scouting potential lunch spots and—oh yeah—actual work.

A:

OK, we're going to finish on maybe the most difficult-to-believe segment of the show: A recent study linked erectile dysfunction and vaping. You know: healthy smoking.

The 2021 population-based study was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. It found that daily users of electronic cigarettes are more than twice as likely to report ED symptoms as men who have never used e-cigarettes.

Finally! A reason not to vape. We are joking. There are plenty of reasons not to vape, including cancer, lung disease, and being fined on airplanes.

That's our show! For more on these topics and answers to your sexual health questions, visit Giddy, the world's largest resource for sexual health news and reporting, at getmegiddy.com. Until next time, I'm Carlos O'Leary and this has been The Quickie.

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