For a great number of smut-seekers, "free porn" and "internet porn" are effectively synonymous. When the adult film industry's former revenue models collapsed during the digital revolution, sites such as Pornhub and xHamster filled the content void, training an entire generation to stream their skin flicks for free. Nearly 20 years on, there's more free porn online than ever, a development driven by the ubiquity of these sites.

But perhaps "free" is the wrong way to think about this content. Porn you don't pay for comes with a human cost, as the piracy that delivers it to the masses has decimated the livelihoods of adult performers and endangered their safety.

Precise facts and figures on the adult film industry's value are hard to come by, because most of the major players aren't publicly traded. However, observations of its restructuring since its "golden age" in the 1970s and '80s reveal grim trends. Megastars like Jenna Jameson don't seem to exist anymore, because the multiyear studio contracts that top performers once commanded no longer