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Breast Health

Breast Cancer

The Basics
Risk Factors
Symptoms and Diagnosis
Treatment
Life After Breast Cancer

The Basics

The Facts About Breast Cancer

A diagnosis of breast cancer is scary. Knowing the facts can help physically and emotionally.

We spoke with experts about the latest research into how aspirin affects cancer cell growth.

All aboard the MammoVan! Hospitals are taking lifesaving technology on the road.

Detection rates, treatment options and outcomes all vary depending on where you live.

Risk Factors

Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Know your risk and how to minimize it to decrease the odds of a breast cancer diagnosis.

You may think you're in the clear after a negative result, but that's no time to get complacent.

Getting appropriate amounts of this essential nutrient can improve your health in many ways.

Women with a higher genetic risk may want to avoid steroids, but more research is needed.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Symptoms and Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

First steps in the breast cancer fight: Know something is wrong; get a professional diagnosis.

The senator was diagnosed with breast cancer after delaying her mammogram.

Updated recommendations have caused some confusion. Here's clarification.

More than 27,000 women under age 45 are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year.

Treatment

Treatment of Breast Cancer

Multiple treatment options offer women choices—and a better chance of beating breast cancer.

Practical preparations to prevent the caregiver from getting overwhelmed.

This surgical treatment option removes cancer while preserving the aesthetics of your breasts.

Experts explain what to expect as you're recovering from this major operation.

Life After Breast Cancer

Life After Breast Cancer

To survive the challenges of breast cancer, accepting the physical and emotional changes is key.

For one woman, the memory of cancer remains.

After breast cancer surgery, there are new factors to consider when shopping for underwear.

Unable to get pregnant while in remission, I turned to surrogacy—and received more than a baby.